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Anura3D MPM Research Community

Numerical modelling and simulation of large deformations and soil–water–structure interaction using the material point method (MPM)

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MPM Training Course

Modelling large deformation and soil–water–structure interaction using the material point method

12–13 January 2017
Deltares, Delft, The Netherlands

Large deformation and soil–water–structure interaction exists in many environmental and civil engineering problems, such as landslides and slope instabilities, installation of piles in saturated soils, settlement due to consolidation processes, fluidisation and sedimentation processes in submerged slopes, internal erosion in dykes, and scouring around offshore structures. Modelling these processes is challenging due to hydro-mechanical coupling, large deformation, and contact problems.
The material point method (MPM) is a point-based numerical approach capable of modelling large deformations and recently, within the framework of the MPM Research Community, it has been extended to cope with complicated soil–water–structure interactions.

First International Conference on the Material Point Method for Modelling Large Deformation and Soil–Water–Structure Interaction (MPM2017)

10–13 January 2017
Deltares Delft, The Netherlands

We are delighted to invite you to join us at the First International Conference on the Material Point Method for “Modelling Large Deformation and Soil–Water–Structure Interaction” organised by the Anura3D MPM Research Community in January 2017 in Delft. This is the first conference following a series of international workshops and symposia previously held in Padova (2016), Barcelona (2015), Cambridge (2014) and Delft (2013).

The aim of the conference is to provide an international forum for presenting and discussing the latest developments in both the fundamental basis and the applicability of state-of-the-art computational methods that can be effectively used for solving a variety of large deformation problems in geotechnical and hydraulic engineering. Special focus is on the numerical modelling of interaction between soils, water and structures where the interface and transition between solid and fluid behaviour plays an essential role.

For more information and the latest news regarding the conference programme and registration, please regularly visit our website at www.mpm2017.eu.

We are looking forward to welcoming you in Delft in January 2017!
The MPM 2017 Organising Committee

Thesis Defence: Roel Tielen

High-order material point method

R.P.W.M. Tielen

Date and Time
Wednesday, 6 July 2016, 15:30 h
Location
Delft University of Technology, Faculty EEMCS (building 36), Lecture hall "Chip"

Abstract
The material point method (MPM) is a meshfree mixed Lagrangian-Eulerian method which utilizes moving Lagrangian material points that store physical properties of a deforming continuum and a fixed Eulerian finite element mesh to solve the equations of motion for individual time steps. MPM proved to be successful in simulating mechanical problems which involve large deformations of history-dependent materials. The solution on the background grid is found in MPM by a variational formulation. The integrals resulting from this formulation are numerically approximated by using the material points as integration points. However, the quality of this numerical quadrature rule decreases when the material points become unevenly distributed inside the mesh.

It is common practice in MPM to adopt piecewise linear basis functions for approximating the solution of the variational form. A problem arises from the discontinuity of the gradients of these basis functions at element boundaries leading to unphysical oscillations of computed stresses when material points cross element boundaries. Such grid crossing errors significantly affect the quality of the numerical solution and may lead to a lack of spatial convergence.

First MPM-DREDGE Training Course

The course material of the First MPM-DREDGE Training Course held on 3 May 2016 at the University of Cambridge is now available on this website.

REMINDER: Abstract submission deadline -- 4 April 2016

First International Conference on the Material Point Method for
Modelling Large Deformation and Soil–Water–Structure Interaction

10–13 January 2017, Delft, The Netherlands

We are delighted to invite you to join us at the First International Conference on the Material Point Method for “Modelling Large Deformation and Soil–Water–Structure Interaction” organised by the MPM Research Community in January 2017 in Delft. This is the first conference following a series of international workshops and symposia previously held in Barcelona (2015), Cambridge (2014) and Delft (2013) in the context of the FP7 Marie-Curie project MPM-DREDGE.

The aim of the conference is to provide an international forum for presenting and discussing the latest developments in both the fundamental basis and the applicability of state-of-the-art computational methods that can be effectively used for solving a variety of large deformation problems in geotechnical and hydraulic engineering. Special focus is on the numerical modelling of interaction between soils, water and structures where the interface and transition between solid and fluid behaviour plays an essential role.

Papers on any aspect of these subjects are most welcome. Active discussion on key topics will be facilitated through invited keynote lectures. In addition, the partners of the MPM-DREDGE project will present the highlights of their research programme, achieved through intense collaboration between industry and academia. The results include validated computational tools based on the material point method to improve the understanding of installation of geocontainers, liquefaction of submarine slopes, landslides and erosion around offshore and near-shore structures.